• ABOUT MUKTI
    ABOUT MUKTI

    ABOUT MUKTI

    Mukti’s name originates in Sanskrit and is most often translated as “liberation,” a term used in Vedanta and Buddhism much the way the term “salvation” is used in Christianity. Mukti has been the Associate Teacher of Open Gate Sangha since 2004 and has been a student of her husband, Adyashanti, since he began teaching in 1996, when they founded Open Gate Sangha together.

    Previously, Mukti was raised and schooled in the Catholic tradition and also studied the teachings of Paramahansa Yogananda for over 20 years—two paths that have greatly informed her journeys into meditation, introspection, and prayer.

    She holds a master’s degree in Traditional Chinese Medicine, a license in acupuncture, and a Hatha Yoga teaching certification. These backgrounds in body awareness and the healing arts, as well as her years of study with Adyashanti, largely inform her presentation style, her recommended inquiry methods, and her interest in the energetic unfolding of realization and embodiment.

    PRIVATE MEETINGS

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  • EXPLORE TEACHINGS
    EXPLORE TEACHINGS

    THE JOURNEY OF SPIRIT IN HUMANITY

    Our human journey of coming to know Spirit is made complete in the journey of Spirit coming to know and express itself in our human life and in our shared world. I welcome you to the teachings here, which are meant to facilitate these journeys and to further the union of human and Spirit natures, through processes of conscious realization and harmonization. . . .

    ~ Mukti

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  • QI GONG WITH MUKTI
    QI GONG WITH MUKTI

    Qi Gong with Mukti

    Qi gong is a Chinese term often translated as “cultivating energy” or “cultivating skill with energy.” This routine is based on the Five Treasures qi gong series; it has been modified greatly, giving it more of a yoga feel with some lengthening, stretching, and “noodling” around to release tensions. Mukti teaches qi gong at her meditation retreats to offer balance and energy harmonization, amidst sitting several periods of silent meditation and quiet contemplation each day.

    There are two versions of this routine available. The first one has lengthy instruction and brief standing guided meditations. It runs about half an hour and is recommended for new viewers. See the READ MORE link to access. The other one is about 15 minutes and is given in silence, offered for those who know the background instruction. You can find that video HERE. Please enjoy these videos for health of body, mind, and spirit, and to compliment spiritual practices oriented toward self realization and embodying conscious expression.

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FEATURED VIDEO

A Wordless Teaching

From: Sunday Community Practice

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Mukti expresses her intention to weave Adya’s teachings into her talks as a way to keep him close to our hearts while he is on sabbatical. She retells, in her own enjoyable words, the story of Adya’s first encounter with his teacher, Arvis Joen Justi, and shares her interpretation of what was learned through that experience.

Quotes from this Video:

“For me, as a person who has a real connection to the spirit of Zen, and to all the stories that Adya has told over the years, there’s something just so touching and beautiful to me about a wordless teaching.”

“It’s amazing how there’s a whole lineage of practitioners behind us, through centuries, that have really dedicated their time and attention to the depth of being that aligns our human nature with a sense of our nature as spirit.”

FEATURED PROGRAM
Pivotal Teachings of AdyashantiRecollections and Reflections with Mukti
Talks, Meditation, Q&A with Mukti

December 9-11, 2022

REGISTRATION CLOSES DECEMBER 7

FEATURED PROGRAM

FROM MUKTI'S RETREAT INVITATION

This year of Adya’s sabbatical has been an opportunity to cherish so many of the teachings that he has poured forth to date, and a time to allow your own wisdom and your living knowledge of his teachings to come to the fore.

During this retreat, I will be sharing pivotal pointers from Adya’s past teachings, particularly those that I have found to be most transformative. And I’ll be recollecting meaningful encounters that I’ve had with him as his student as well as resulting insights that I carry forward into my own teachings. . . .